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Fairy

Fairy Aktuelle Pressemeldungen: Fairy

Fairy ist ein Handgeschirrspülmittel des US-amerikanischen Konsumgüterkonzerns Procter & Gamble. Eingeführt und bekannt wurde die Marke Fairy Ultra durch den Villarriba und Villabajo-Werbespot im Jahre Es ersetzte das Produkt Spüli. ˈfairy tale SUBST. 1. fairy tale (story for children): fairy tale. Fairy ist ein Handgeschirrspülmittel des US-amerikanischen Konsumgüterkonzerns Procter & Gamble. Eingeführt und bekannt wurde die Marke Fairy Ultra. Lernen Sie die Übersetzung für 'fairy' in LEOs Englisch ⇔ Deutsch Wörterbuch. Mit Flexionstabellen der verschiedenen Fälle und Zeiten ✓ Aussprache und. Ihre Privatsphäre. Wenn Sie eine Website besuchen, kann diese Informationen über Ihren Browser abrufen oder speichern. Dies geschieht meist in Form von.

Fairy

Englisch-Deutsch-Übersetzungen für fairy im Online-Wörterbuch cufica.co (​Deutschwörterbuch). Fairy ist ein Handgeschirrspülmittel des US-amerikanischen Konsumgüterkonzerns Procter & Gamble. Eingeführt und bekannt wurde die Marke Fairy Ultra. fairy Bedeutung, Definition fairy: 1. an imaginary creature with magic powers, usually represented as a very small person with wings.

Fairy Video

Emma Pretend Play w/ Flying Flutterbye Fairy Deluxe Light Up Doll Girl Toy

It can appear as a dwarf creature typically having green clothes and hair, living underground or in stone heaps, and characteristically exercising magic powers to benevolent ends; as a diminutive sprite commonly in the shape of a delicate, beautiful, ageless winged woman dressed in diaphanous white clothing, inhabiting fairyland, but making usually well-intentioned intervention in personal human affairs; or as a tiny, mischievous, and protective creature generally associated with a household hearth.

While the term fairy goes back only to the Middle Ages in Europe , analogues to these beings in varying forms appear in both written and oral literature , from the Sanskrit gandharva semidivine celestial musicians to the nymphs of Greek mythology and Homer, the jinni of Arabic mythology, and similar folk characters of the Samoans, of the Arctic peoples, and of other indigenous Americans.

The fairies of the past were feared as dangerous and powerful beings who were sometimes friendly to humans but could also be cruel or mischievous.

Fairies are usually conceived as being characteristically beautiful or handsome and as having lives corresponding to those of human beings, though longer.

They have no souls and at death simply perish. They often carry off children, leaving changeling substitutes, and they also carry off adults to fairyland, which resembles pre-Christian abodes of the dead.

People transported to fairyland cannot return if they eat or drink there. Fairy and human lovers may marry, though only with restrictions whose violation ends the marriage and, often, the life of the human.

Some female fairies are deadly to human lovers. Fairies are said to be of human size or smaller, down to a height of 3 inches 7.

Female fairies may tell fortunes, particularly prophesying at births and foretelling deaths. Several herbs, especially St. Fairy lore is particularly prevalent in Ireland , Cornwall, Wales, and Scotland.

See also brownie ; dwarf ; elf ; fairy tale ; goblin ; kobold ; leprechaun ; Märchen ; pixie. Info Print Cite.

Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree See Article History.

Fairie was used adjectivally, meaning "enchanted" as in fairie knight , fairie queene , but also became a generic term for various "enchanted" creatures during the Late Middle English period.

Literature of the Elizabethan era conflated elves with the fairies of Romance culture, rendering these terms somewhat interchangeable.

The Victorian era and Edwardian era saw a heightened increase of interest in fairies. The Celtic Revival cast fairies as part of Ireland's cultural heritage.

Carole Silvers and others suggested this fascination of English antiquarians arose from a reaction to greater industrialization and loss of older folk ways.

Fairies are generally described as human in appearance and having magical powers. Diminutive fairies of various kinds have been reported through centuries, ranging from quite tiny to the size of a human child.

Some depictions of fairies show them with footwear, others as barefoot. Wings, while common in Victorian and later artworks, are rare in folklore; fairies flew by means of magic, sometimes perched on ragwort stems or the backs of birds.

Early modern fairies does not derive from a single origin; the term is a conflation of disparate elements from folk belief sources, influenced by literature and speculation.

The Scandinavian elves also served as an influence. Folklorists and mythologists have variously depicted fairies as: the unworthy dead, the children of Eve , a kind of demon , a species independent of humans, an older race of humans, and fallen angels.

Folklorists have suggested that 'fairies' arose from various earlier beliefs, which lost currency with the advent of Christianity. King James , in his dissertation Daemonologie , stated the term "faries" referred to illusory spirits demonic entities that prophesied to, consorted with, and transported the individuals they served; in medieval times, a witch or sorcerer who had a pact with a familiar spirit might receive these services.

A Christian tenet held that fairies were a class of "demoted" angels. In England's Theosophist circles of the 19th century, a belief in the "angelic" nature of fairies was reported.

The more Earthbound Devas included nature spirits , elementals , and fairies , [21] which were described as appearing in the form of colored flames, roughly the size of a human.

Gardner had likened fairies to butterflies, whose function was to provide an essential link between the energy of the sun and the plants of Earth, describing them as having no clean-cut shape At one time it was thought that fairies were originally worshiped as minor deities, such as nymphs and tree spirits, [24] and with the burgeoning predominance of the Christian Church , reverence for these deities carried on, but in a dwindling state of perceived power.

Many deprecated deities of older folklore and myth were repurposed as fairies in Victorian fiction See the works of W. Yeats for examples.

A recorded Christian belief of the 17th century cast all fairies as demons. Lewis cast as a politic disassociation from faeries.

This contentious environment of thought contributed to the modern meaning of 'fairies'. One belief held that fairies were spirits of the dead.

There is a theory that fairy folklore evolved from folk memories of a prehistoric race: newcomers superseded a body of earlier human or humanoid peoples, and the memories of this defeated race developed into modern conceptions of fairies.

Proponents find support in the tradition of cold iron as a charm against fairies, viewed as a cultural memory of invaders with iron weapons displacing peoples who had just stone, bone, wood, etc.

In folklore, flint arrowheads from the Stone Age were attributed to the fairies as " elfshot ", [37] while their green clothing and underground homes spoke to a need for camouflage and covert shelter from hostile humans, their magic a necessary skill for combating those with superior weaponry.

In a Victorian tenet of evolution, mythic cannibalism among ogres was attributed to memories of more savage races, practising alongside "superior" races of more refined sensibilities.

A theory that fairies, et al. Much folklore of fairies involves methods of protecting oneself from their malice, by means such as cold iron, charms see amulet , talisman of rowan trees or various herbs , or simply shunning locations "known" to be theirs, ergo avoiding offending any fairies.

More dangerous behaviors were also attributed to fairies; any form of sudden death might have stemmed from a fairy kidnapping, the evident corpse a magical replica of wood.

In Scottish folklore , fairies are divided into the Seelie Court more beneficently inclined, but still dangerous , and the Unseelie Court more malicious.

While fairies of the Seelie Court enjoyed playing generally harmless pranks on humans, those of the Unseelie Court often brought harm to humans for entertainment.

Trooping fairies refers to those who appear in groups and might form settlements, as opposed to solitary fairies, who do not live or associate with others of their kind.

In this context, the term fairy is usually held in a wider sense, including various similar beings, such as dwarves and elves of Germanic folklore.

A considerable amount of lore about fairies revolves around changelings , fairy children left in the place of stolen human babies.

In pre-industrial Europe, a peasant family's subsistence frequently depended upon the productive labor of each member, and a person who was a permanent drain on the family's scarce resources could pose a threat to the survival of the entire family.

In terms of protective charms, wearing clothing inside out, [50] church bells, St. John's wort , and four-leaf clovers are regarded as effective.

In Newfoundland folklore, the most popular type of fairy protection is bread, varying from stale bread to hard tack or a slice of fresh homemade bread.

Bread is associated with the home and the hearth, as well as with industry and the taming of nature, and as such, seems to be disliked by some types of fairies.

On the other hand, in much of the Celtic folklore , baked goods are a traditional offering to the folk, as are cream and butter.

This may be a distinguishing trait between the Seelie Court from the Unseelie Court, such that fairies use them to protect themselves from more wicked members of their race.

While many fairies will confuse travelers on the path, the will-o'-the-wisp can be avoided by not following it. Certain locations, known to be haunts of fairies, are to be avoided; C.

Lewis reported hearing of a cottage more feared for its reported fairies than its reported ghost. Paths that the fairies travel are also wise to avoid.

Home-owners have knocked corners from houses because the corner blocked the fairy path, [56] and cottages have been built with the front and back doors in line, so that the owners could, in need, leave them both open and let the fairies troop through all night.

Other actions were believed to offend fairies. Brownies were known to be driven off by being given clothing, though some folktales recounted that they were offended by the inferior quality of the garments given, and others merely stated it, some even recounting that the brownie was delighted with the gift and left with it.

Millers were thought by the Scots to be "no canny", owing to their ability to control the forces of nature, such as fire in the kiln, water in the burn, and for being able to set machinery a-whirring.

Superstitious communities sometimes believed that the miller must be in league with the fairies. In Scotland, fairies were often mischievous and to be feared.

No one dared to set foot in the mill or kiln at night, as it was known that the fairies brought their corn to be milled after dark.

So long as the locals believed this, the miller could sleep secure in the knowledge that his stores were not being robbed.

John Fraser, the miller of Whitehill, claimed to have hidden and watched the fairies trying unsuccessfully to work the mill.

He said he decided to come out of hiding and help them, upon which one of the fairy women gave him a gowpen double handful of meal and told him to put it in his empty girnal store , saying that the store would remain full for a long time, no matter how much he took out.

It is also believed that to know the name of a particular fairy, a person could summon it and force it to do their bidding.

The name could be used as an insult towards the fairy in question, but it could also rather contradictorily be used to grant powers and gifts to the user.

Before the advent of modern medicine, many physiological conditions were untreatable and when children were born with abnormalities, it was common to blame the fairies.

Sometimes fairies are described as assuming the guise of an animal. In "The Legend of Knockshigowna ", in order to frighten a farmer who pastured his herd on fairy ground, a fairy queen took on the appearance of a great horse, with the wings of an eagle, and a tail like a dragon, hissing loud and spitting fire.

Then she would change into a little man lame of a leg, with a bull's head, and a lambent flame playing round it. In the 19th-century child ballad " Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight ", the elf-knight is a Bluebeard figure, and Isabel must trick and kill him to preserve her life.

A common feature of the fairies is the use of magic to disguise their appearance. Fairy gold is notoriously unreliable, appearing as gold when paid but soon thereafter revealing itself to be leaves, gorse blossoms, gingerbread cakes, or a variety of other comparatively worthless things.

These illusions are also implicit in the tales of fairy ointment. Many tales from Northern Europe [74] [75] tell of a mortal woman summoned to attend a fairy birth — sometimes attending a mortal, kidnapped woman's childbed.

Invariably, the woman is given something for the child's eyes, usually an ointment; through mischance, or sometimes curiosity, she uses it on one or both of her own eyes.

At that point, she sees where she is; one midwife realizes that she was not attending a great lady in a fine house but her own runaway maid-servant in a wretched cave.

She escapes without making her ability known but sooner or later betrays that she can see the fairies. She is invariably blinded in that eye or in both if she used the ointment on both.

There have been claims by people in the past, like William Blake , to have seen fairy funerals. They are thought to represent the main deities of pre-Christian Gaelic Ireland.

They are variously said to be ancestors, the spirits of nature, or goddesses and gods. These bodies be so pliable through the sublety of Spirits that agitate them, that they can make them appear or disappear at pleasure [79].

The word "fairy" was used to describe an individual inhabitant of Faerie before the time of Chaucer. Fairies appeared in medieval romances as one of the beings that a knight errant might encounter.

A fairy lady appeared to Sir Launfal and demanded his love; like the fairy bride of ordinary folklore, she imposed a prohibition on him that in time he violated.

Sir Orfeo 's wife was carried off by the King of Faerie. Huon of Bordeaux is aided by King Oberon. The oldest fairies on record in England were first described by the historian Gervase of Tilbury in the 13th century.

Fairy Bei dem Du Deinen Freunden Absinth-Geschichten erzählst, denn wie Du sicher schon bemerkt hast, wirst Du beim Trinken eines Weines oder anderen Getränks nicht immer unbedingt von diesem sprechen wollen, wohingegen eine Runde Absinth immer unwillkürlich zu Geschichten und Legenden rund um die Grüne Fee anreg…. Wählen Sie ein Wörterbuch aus. Sommerurlaub total! Bei dem Du Deinen Freunden Absinth-Geschichten erzählst, denn 2 Reisen Und 500 Euro Gewonnen Du sicher schon bemerkt hast, wirst Du beim Trinken eines Weines oder anderen Getränks nicht immer unbedingt von diesem sprechen wollen, wohingegen eine Runde Absinth immer unwillkürlich zu Geschichten und Legenden rund um die Grüne Fee anreg… www. Neue Wörter flexi-schooling. Enjoyed throughout the world and then in secret until Fairy reappearance in the early years of this century, the mysterious fairy is now revealing her secrets thanks to a new tourist trail. Mehr… deutsch www. Das Wort im Beispielsatz passt nicht zum Stichwort. Since she joined les Ballets de Monte-Carlo in Augustshe has danced, among others, major roles in Jean-Christophe Maillot's creations such as the fairy in Cinderella, Lady Capulet in Romeo and Juliet, and Handball LГ¤nderspiel Deutschland Spanien created the role of Helena in le See more. Ausgewählter Wermut, Fenchel und Anis sind die Fairy Basis. Englisch-Deutsch-Übersetzungen für fairy im Online-Wörterbuch cufica.co (​Deutschwörterbuch). Übersetzung für 'fairy' im kostenlosen Englisch-Deutsch Wörterbuch von LANGENSCHEIDT – mit Beispielen, Synonymen und Aussprache. course, also knitting, weaving etc. and fairy tale wool as well as scissors, moreover [ ]. fairy Bedeutung, Definition fairy: 1. an imaginary creature with magic powers, usually represented as a very small person with wings. Worttrennung: fairy, Plural: fair·ies. Aussprache: IPA: [ˈfɛəɹɪ], Plural: [. Fairy Barrie 's novel The Little White Bird Fairy, and was incorporated into his later works about the character. Fairy-like beings in folklore. Invariably, the woman is given something for Promi Tipp Em child's eyes, usually an ointment; through mischance, or sometimes curiosity, she uses it on one or both of her own eyes. Fairies or their counterparts appear in the legends of a good part of the world. Fairies are said to be of human size or smaller, down to a height of 3 inches 7. Online Etymology Https://cufica.co/free-play-online-casino/monza-formel-1-2020.php. South Africa English. Philippines English. Klicken Sie auf die Pfeile, um die Übersetzungsrichtung zu ändern. It's no good asking her to take care of the children - she's away with the fairies most of the time. It is Fairy legendary, mysterious landscape full of myths, secrets, elves please click for source fairies. Das Wort des Tages observatory. Nymphe feminine Femininum f fairy.

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Learn More in these related Britannica articles:. Fairies or their counterparts appear in the legends of a good part of the world.

It is hard to define them, for in one place they will appear in full human size, in another as little creatures inhabiting mounds or caves or living under the….

Lauma s dwell in the forest near water or stones. Yearning for children but being unable to give birth, they often kidnap babies to raise as their own.

Sometimes they marry young men and…. Changeling , in European folklore, a deformed or imbecilic offspring of fairies or elves substituted by them surreptitiously for a human infant.

According to legend, the abducted human children are given to the devil or used to strengthen fairy stock.

The return of the original child may be effected by making…. History at your fingertips. Sign up here to see what happened On This Day , every day in your inbox!

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The Victorian era and Edwardian era saw a heightened increase of interest in fairies. The Celtic Revival cast fairies as part of Ireland's cultural heritage.

Carole Silvers and others suggested this fascination of English antiquarians arose from a reaction to greater industrialization and loss of older folk ways.

Fairies are generally described as human in appearance and having magical powers. Diminutive fairies of various kinds have been reported through centuries, ranging from quite tiny to the size of a human child.

Some depictions of fairies show them with footwear, others as barefoot. Wings, while common in Victorian and later artworks, are rare in folklore; fairies flew by means of magic, sometimes perched on ragwort stems or the backs of birds.

Early modern fairies does not derive from a single origin; the term is a conflation of disparate elements from folk belief sources, influenced by literature and speculation.

The Scandinavian elves also served as an influence. Folklorists and mythologists have variously depicted fairies as: the unworthy dead, the children of Eve , a kind of demon , a species independent of humans, an older race of humans, and fallen angels.

Folklorists have suggested that 'fairies' arose from various earlier beliefs, which lost currency with the advent of Christianity.

King James , in his dissertation Daemonologie , stated the term "faries" referred to illusory spirits demonic entities that prophesied to, consorted with, and transported the individuals they served; in medieval times, a witch or sorcerer who had a pact with a familiar spirit might receive these services.

A Christian tenet held that fairies were a class of "demoted" angels. In England's Theosophist circles of the 19th century, a belief in the "angelic" nature of fairies was reported.

The more Earthbound Devas included nature spirits , elementals , and fairies , [21] which were described as appearing in the form of colored flames, roughly the size of a human.

Gardner had likened fairies to butterflies, whose function was to provide an essential link between the energy of the sun and the plants of Earth, describing them as having no clean-cut shape At one time it was thought that fairies were originally worshiped as minor deities, such as nymphs and tree spirits, [24] and with the burgeoning predominance of the Christian Church , reverence for these deities carried on, but in a dwindling state of perceived power.

Many deprecated deities of older folklore and myth were repurposed as fairies in Victorian fiction See the works of W.

Yeats for examples. A recorded Christian belief of the 17th century cast all fairies as demons.

Lewis cast as a politic disassociation from faeries. This contentious environment of thought contributed to the modern meaning of 'fairies'.

One belief held that fairies were spirits of the dead. There is a theory that fairy folklore evolved from folk memories of a prehistoric race: newcomers superseded a body of earlier human or humanoid peoples, and the memories of this defeated race developed into modern conceptions of fairies.

Proponents find support in the tradition of cold iron as a charm against fairies, viewed as a cultural memory of invaders with iron weapons displacing peoples who had just stone, bone, wood, etc.

In folklore, flint arrowheads from the Stone Age were attributed to the fairies as " elfshot ", [37] while their green clothing and underground homes spoke to a need for camouflage and covert shelter from hostile humans, their magic a necessary skill for combating those with superior weaponry.

In a Victorian tenet of evolution, mythic cannibalism among ogres was attributed to memories of more savage races, practising alongside "superior" races of more refined sensibilities.

A theory that fairies, et al. Much folklore of fairies involves methods of protecting oneself from their malice, by means such as cold iron, charms see amulet , talisman of rowan trees or various herbs , or simply shunning locations "known" to be theirs, ergo avoiding offending any fairies.

More dangerous behaviors were also attributed to fairies; any form of sudden death might have stemmed from a fairy kidnapping, the evident corpse a magical replica of wood.

In Scottish folklore , fairies are divided into the Seelie Court more beneficently inclined, but still dangerous , and the Unseelie Court more malicious.

While fairies of the Seelie Court enjoyed playing generally harmless pranks on humans, those of the Unseelie Court often brought harm to humans for entertainment.

Trooping fairies refers to those who appear in groups and might form settlements, as opposed to solitary fairies, who do not live or associate with others of their kind.

In this context, the term fairy is usually held in a wider sense, including various similar beings, such as dwarves and elves of Germanic folklore.

A considerable amount of lore about fairies revolves around changelings , fairy children left in the place of stolen human babies. In pre-industrial Europe, a peasant family's subsistence frequently depended upon the productive labor of each member, and a person who was a permanent drain on the family's scarce resources could pose a threat to the survival of the entire family.

In terms of protective charms, wearing clothing inside out, [50] church bells, St. John's wort , and four-leaf clovers are regarded as effective.

In Newfoundland folklore, the most popular type of fairy protection is bread, varying from stale bread to hard tack or a slice of fresh homemade bread.

Bread is associated with the home and the hearth, as well as with industry and the taming of nature, and as such, seems to be disliked by some types of fairies.

On the other hand, in much of the Celtic folklore , baked goods are a traditional offering to the folk, as are cream and butter.

This may be a distinguishing trait between the Seelie Court from the Unseelie Court, such that fairies use them to protect themselves from more wicked members of their race.

While many fairies will confuse travelers on the path, the will-o'-the-wisp can be avoided by not following it. Certain locations, known to be haunts of fairies, are to be avoided; C.

Lewis reported hearing of a cottage more feared for its reported fairies than its reported ghost. Paths that the fairies travel are also wise to avoid.

Home-owners have knocked corners from houses because the corner blocked the fairy path, [56] and cottages have been built with the front and back doors in line, so that the owners could, in need, leave them both open and let the fairies troop through all night.

Other actions were believed to offend fairies. Brownies were known to be driven off by being given clothing, though some folktales recounted that they were offended by the inferior quality of the garments given, and others merely stated it, some even recounting that the brownie was delighted with the gift and left with it.

Millers were thought by the Scots to be "no canny", owing to their ability to control the forces of nature, such as fire in the kiln, water in the burn, and for being able to set machinery a-whirring.

Superstitious communities sometimes believed that the miller must be in league with the fairies. In Scotland, fairies were often mischievous and to be feared.

No one dared to set foot in the mill or kiln at night, as it was known that the fairies brought their corn to be milled after dark.

So long as the locals believed this, the miller could sleep secure in the knowledge that his stores were not being robbed.

John Fraser, the miller of Whitehill, claimed to have hidden and watched the fairies trying unsuccessfully to work the mill. He said he decided to come out of hiding and help them, upon which one of the fairy women gave him a gowpen double handful of meal and told him to put it in his empty girnal store , saying that the store would remain full for a long time, no matter how much he took out.

It is also believed that to know the name of a particular fairy, a person could summon it and force it to do their bidding. The name could be used as an insult towards the fairy in question, but it could also rather contradictorily be used to grant powers and gifts to the user.

Before the advent of modern medicine, many physiological conditions were untreatable and when children were born with abnormalities, it was common to blame the fairies.

Sometimes fairies are described as assuming the guise of an animal. In "The Legend of Knockshigowna ", in order to frighten a farmer who pastured his herd on fairy ground, a fairy queen took on the appearance of a great horse, with the wings of an eagle, and a tail like a dragon, hissing loud and spitting fire.

Then she would change into a little man lame of a leg, with a bull's head, and a lambent flame playing round it. In the 19th-century child ballad " Lady Isabel and the Elf-Knight ", the elf-knight is a Bluebeard figure, and Isabel must trick and kill him to preserve her life.

A common feature of the fairies is the use of magic to disguise their appearance. Fairy gold is notoriously unreliable, appearing as gold when paid but soon thereafter revealing itself to be leaves, gorse blossoms, gingerbread cakes, or a variety of other comparatively worthless things.

These illusions are also implicit in the tales of fairy ointment. Many tales from Northern Europe [74] [75] tell of a mortal woman summoned to attend a fairy birth — sometimes attending a mortal, kidnapped woman's childbed.

Invariably, the woman is given something for the child's eyes, usually an ointment; through mischance, or sometimes curiosity, she uses it on one or both of her own eyes.

At that point, she sees where she is; one midwife realizes that she was not attending a great lady in a fine house but her own runaway maid-servant in a wretched cave.

She escapes without making her ability known but sooner or later betrays that she can see the fairies.

She is invariably blinded in that eye or in both if she used the ointment on both. There have been claims by people in the past, like William Blake , to have seen fairy funerals.

They are thought to represent the main deities of pre-Christian Gaelic Ireland. They are variously said to be ancestors, the spirits of nature, or goddesses and gods.

These bodies be so pliable through the sublety of Spirits that agitate them, that they can make them appear or disappear at pleasure [79].

The word "fairy" was used to describe an individual inhabitant of Faerie before the time of Chaucer. Fairies appeared in medieval romances as one of the beings that a knight errant might encounter.

A fairy lady appeared to Sir Launfal and demanded his love; like the fairy bride of ordinary folklore, she imposed a prohibition on him that in time he violated.

Sir Orfeo 's wife was carried off by the King of Faerie. Huon of Bordeaux is aided by King Oberon. The oldest fairies on record in England were first described by the historian Gervase of Tilbury in the 13th century.

Morgan le Fay , whose connection to the realm of Faerie is implied in her name, in Le Morte d'Arthur is a woman whose magic powers stem from study.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a late tale, but the Green Knight himself is an otherworldly being.

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